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How to Get Publicly Available Epinephrine in Your Town


Publicly Available Epinephrine

Canada's Largest Publicly Available Auto Injector Program


Sussex straddles the Kennebacasis River, 70 km (43 mi) northeast of Saint John, and is a major dairy products producer in the province. It is home to Atlantic Canada's largest hot air balloon festival.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sussex,_New_Brunswick

It looks like someone should update that wikipedia definition to read “It is home to Canada's largest publicly available auto injector program.”

 

Carrying epinephrine with you at all times is the golden rule when you have severe allergies - hopefully in a CarryNine Wallet Auvi-Q Case. But, when you have a first reaction or you're stung by bees or insects or you simply forgot to bring your Epipen with you, publicly available epinephrine could save your life.  

30 Epinephrine Auto-Injectors in the Region

Canadian nurse practitioner Kelly Dunfield worked with her son Robert, a first-year medical student, and local allergist Dr. Andrea Canty for over a year to get epinephrine auto-injectors (Allerject) in about 30 locations around the region including restaurants, schools, arenas, seniors’ homes, the civic centre, golf course, ski hill, fire station and public health.

Together her team developed a proposal for the production of cabinets, which was funded by the Sussex and Area Community Foundation. Sanofi Canada provided an 18-month supply of Allerject® auto-injectors and educational materials, and Anaphylaxis Canada provided training to the team.

Kelly's passion was ignited by personal and professional life as she has encountered severe allergies. Her husband has a serious food allergy and as a nurse, she has attended to people arriving at the emergency department in full-blown anaphylactic shock. She's also counseled many patients who are at risk.

Publicly Available Epinephrine Program Has Already Saved a Life

After only a couple of weeks under its belt, the program has already saved a life. On September 10, 2015 Wellington McLean, 53 was out riding an ATV with his family when he was stung in the face by wasps and went into anaphylaxis. McLean's quick thinking daughter drove her father to a hunting lodge, located approximately 23 kilometers away, that happened to be a part of the program. Muriel McCallum, a first-aid responder who was at the lodge, administered the stock epinephrine that was available at the lodge under the new program.

If the units hadn’t been there, I would have watched him die,” McCallum says. She used the adult device first and then because McLean needed a second injection, she also administered the children’s dose. “That’s all I had, but it was enough until the ambulance arrived.”

According to McLean, he's been stung by wasps before but this was the first time he went into anaphylactic shock because of a sting. He now wants the pilot program expanded to other areas.

How to Make Epinephrine Available in Your Town

Robert Dunfield has developed a ‘how-to’ manual for other communities wishing to deliver a public auto-injector program in their towns and cities. To find out more about getting the manual for your community, contact Kelly Dunfield at kelly.dunfield@horizonNB.ca.

 


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